Toute l'actualité du petit prince

Fan Art Friday #122


On Fridays, fans of The Little Prince express their talent with Fan Art Friday!

Send us your creations via our facebook page, we’ll publish them here!

Ana Caroline Guerreiro

Ana Caroline Guerreiro

Andres Si Yo

Andres Si Yo

B Bq King

B Bq King

Benz Chiangthong

Benz Chiangthong

Bren Vargas

Bren Vargas

Fernanda Trovato Fuoco

Fernanda Trovato Fuoco

Karen Kina

Karen Kina

Karla Lopez

Karla Lopez

Luis Godoy‎

Luis Godoy‎

Manuela Iannucci

Manuela Iannucci

Maptiv

Maptiv

Mavis Lola

Mavis Lola

Milena Rosa

Milena Rosa

‎Mona Rahimianmaleki‎

‎Mona Rahimianmaleki‎

Sarah Taylor McClure

Sarah Taylor McClure

謝秉寰

謝秉寰


Bubble pop journey with the Little Prince


Paramount Pictures’ “The Little Prince” might not arrive in theaters until March 18, but the official game for the movie is available now on the App Store. A bubble shooter, it falls right into my “guilty pleasure” genre of addiction, and it features characters from the upcoming feature animated film.

A bubble-popping journey

The protagonist in the film, a little girl, lives with her mother in a very grown-up world. Her neighbor, The Aviator, helps her discover a new world where anything is possible. To embark on her journey through this new realm, you need to help her pop bubbles to travel from her neighborhood and through the city to the adventures that await her.

thelittleprince-1

Discover new excitement and adventure

As the girl meets new characters, such as the Little Prince, she embarks on an adventure far beyond the confines of her city. Each new area she visits brings more bubble-popping excitement. The game features several 3-D maps to explore, with more than 150 challenging levels to beat.

thelittleprince-2

Start popping those bubbles

The Little Prince is designed for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, and requires iOS 6 or later. The game is free to download on the App Store, and does not contain any ads, but there are in-app purchases.


The Little Prince Musical in Calgary ends on February 28 th !


It’s in the genes. Having Andrew Lloyd Webber as your father would set the stage-pardon the pun-for a successful career in musical theatre.  And that is precisely the path Nicholas Lloyd Webber has taken.

Fanfare was the order of the evening Jan 22 as an SRO audience attended the world premiere of The Little Prince-The Musical, based upon the book by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, adapted by Nicholas Lloyd Webber and James D. Reid.  Presented by Theatre Calgary, in association with Lamplighter Drama (London, UK), that Calgary was chosen as the city to premiere the musical deserves a standing ovation.

A musical for children and adults alike, The Little Prince is a tender tale of love, loneliness, friendship, and imagination. When a disenchanted pilot crashes his airplane in the middle of the Sahara desert, he meets a mysterious young prince from a distant asteroid who tells the story of his long journey to Earth – and helps the pilot open his heart again. Written in 1943, The Little Prince is one of the most beloved
books in history and has been translated into more than 250 languages and sold more than 140 million copies worldwide.  Composers Nicholas Lloyd Webber and James D. Reid, who co-wrote the music, lyrics, and libretto for The Little Prince – The Musical, have been working on the project since 2009. After an inaugural staging at the Lyric Theatre (Belfast) in 2011, Lloyd Webber and Reid significantly developed and expanded the musical just in time for its Theatre Calgary premiere.  “In total, it has been seven years in the development and making, but this accounts for the care and detail required when tackling such an enigmatic and well loved story. The Little Prince is spellbinding and captivating, moving through space and time and with an array of weird and wonderful characters” said Webber.

The show was brought to life by one of Canada’s most imaginative designers, Bretta Gerecke-no stranger to the Theatre Calgary stage with her previous designs including Enron, Lost-A Memoir, Beyond Eden and West Side Story.

The must-attend musical runs through Feb 28.


The Little Prince in Versailles ENDS ON FEBRUARY 28th !


2016-01-18-1453145706-6544762-1pp.jpg

A Boy on a Planet.

The beloved book by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry Le Petit Prince — the whimsical story of how a boy on his planet charmed millions of children and adults alike, with his philosophical thoughts and humanitarian ideas — is celebrating its 72nd year in print. A new art space is now showing some more love to the dear little boy in the story.

Perhaps he was the first universe-conscious fictional person to show us the way to simpler things, gentler behavior, and all-around goodness. The book is a classic in French literature, and was required reading in many families. All my kids had to read it once a year, to remind them of thinking differently and incorporate poetry into their lives.

The Aviator.

The Little Prince was published in 1943, and is the most famous work of French aristocrat, writer, poet, and pioneering aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, who died in 1944, at the young age of 44, disappearing during a flight mission to collect intelligence on German troop movements in France.

The novel has been translated in over 250 languages all over the world and was voted the best book of the 20th century in France. To this day, it still sells two million copies each year — and has earned the status of best-selling book ever published.

The simple and short story of only 140 pages is a poetic tale, illustrated by the author himself in naïve watercolors – – a description of how a fallen airplane pilot finds himself stranded in the desert where he meets a boy prince fallen to Earth from a tiny asteroid. The philosophical story includes social criticism and stern views of the cumbersome adult world.

The author reflects on his own life, his search for childhood certainties, his mysticism, and his belief in human courage. Written for children, the book has always resonated with adults. There is also a fox on the tiny planet, and he is a wise one: « One sees clearly only with the heart. What is essential is invisible to the eyes. »

2016-01-18-1453146289-3935050-11pp.jpg

When in Versailles, Be Royal.

Organized by the city of Versailles together with the estate of Saint-Exupéry, the unique exhibit on Le Petit Prince is taking place in the former royal hospital of the castle of Versailles. A distinguished building dating back to 1636, commandeered by Louis XIII (the 13th), the Richaud Royal Hospital had fallen into nothingness, until 2015 when the city of Versailles decided to rehabilitate it and transform it into a multi-usage project.

02016-01-18-1453146019-8457898-5pp.jpg

The historical site now includes lodging, shops and office space, as well as an art gallery in what was the former chapel of the hospital. The revival is a big success for the city. A stone throw from the famous Château, the restoration is now complete, and the first art show in the grand location is the one about Le Petit Prince.

2016-01-18-1453146610-2604448-fox.jpg

More Info:

The exhibit is open until Feb. 28.
Espace Richaud, 78 boulevard de la Reine, Versailles.
Wednesday-Sunday noon to 7 p.m.
Entrance is 5€
Free for under 26, disabled persons, and teachers.

 


Fan Art Friday #121


On Fridays, fans of The Little Prince express their talent with Fan Art Friday!

Send us your creations via our facebook page, we’ll publish them here!

‎Alejandra Recinos‎

‎Alejandra Recinos‎

Almejandra Schloss

Almejandra Schloss

Angelo Gabriel Lion

Angelo Gabriel Lion

Arnaldur Kjárr, is 5 years old

Arnaldur Kjárr, 5 years old

‎Cat Von M Craven‎

‎Cat Von M Craven‎

Dania Morales

Dania Morales

Elino Christopoulou

Elino Christopoulou

Gohü Niemals

Gohü Niemals

Hiroko Kawasaki

Hiroko Kawasaki

Jeniffer Benítez

Jeniffer Benítez

Jenny Hung

Jenny Hung

Julie Ruffenach

Julie Ruffenach

Laura Toranzos

Laura Toranzos

Maria Stefanova

Maria Stefanova

Raúl Ochoa

Raúl Ochoa

Sarah López

Sarah López

Sofia Bocheva

Sofia Bocheva

Tessier Aurélie

Tessier Aurélie

Yadira Luna

Yadira Luna


The Little Prince on stage in Sochi


The Russian Black Sea resort of Sochi, famous for hosting the Winter Olympic Games in 2014 is also the host city for the annual Winter International Arts Festival.

For its ninth edition, the organisers have prepared an outstanding program aimed to surprise the audience with a constellation of theatrical, ballet and music stars,

There is also a world premiere of Don’t Leave Your Planet – a musical based on the book, The Little Prince, by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

Viktor Kramer, the Stage Director says: “Everybody can say they know what this book is about, and every child and every adult is familiar with that.

“But we found out that there, in this novella, is a lot of something unexpected, new, dramatic and even tragic. That’s why we started working on it from scratch.”

The stage sports a sand pit instead of the Sahara Desert, projectors take the place of stars and a picture of a woman instead of the rose that the Little Prince was in love with. The incredible decorations, numerous visual and sound effects deprive one of the feeling that there is only one actor on the stage.

Russian actor Konstantin Khabenskiy, plays the role of the narrator, a pilot whose plane has crashed in the Sahara desert. However if you watch closely, you will notice other Saint-Exupéry characters, such as a king, a conceited man, a drunkard and a businessman who endlessly counted the stars, all impersonated by Khabenskiy.

“Every interesting role and every interesting project is difficult, because it’s new. But it makes me conquer new peaks, it opens up new horizons to me,” says Khabenskiy.

However, he is not alone on the stage. About two dozens musicians – together with Russian conductor and violist Yuri Bashmet create a special mood of the performance.

“The music is created by a Russian composer Kuzma Bodrov, with the use of masterpieces written by Mahler and Brahms, says Bashmet.

“So the melodies are familiar to spectators, but they are not just a copy of world-famous compositions.”

While music score is new, the script is 99 per cent Saint-Exupéry‘s text. However, there is always a place for improvisation and interaction with the audience.

The authors say: in such a way the audience can give more thought to the things Saint-Exupéry wanted to tell us.

“After the first show in Sochi , the next performance will be in Moscow at the end of March, ahead of a tour of Russian cities and abroad,” says Euronews’ reporter Maria Korenyuk.


Money Box : The Little Prince on his plane


In Store ! Best-Seller ! Little Prince on his plane Money Box Size : 25 cm long ; 14cm high Made of plastic by Plastoy Age 3 and more.

Available on the online store

 

Money Box : The Little Prince on his plane


Mark Osborne interviewed by the Montréal Gazette


 

American filmmaker Mark Osborne spent nearly two years in Montreal making The Little Prince, his animated feature adapted from the famous French novella by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry. A French-Quebec co-production, it opens here on Friday, across Canada March 11 and in the U.S. via Paramount Pictures on March 18.

http://montrealgazette.com/entertainment/mark-osborne-helps-the-little-prince-visit-two-worlds


Egypt’s poet Fouad Haddad remembered in musical adaptation of The Little Prince


Men El-Qalb lel Qalb musical, a poetic adaptation of The Little Prince, will run at The National Theatre stage, marking the 30-year memorial of the death of its author, Fouad Haddad.

rehearsal

Men El-Qalb lel Qalb (From Heart to Heart) honours iconic poet Fouad Haddad’s spirit with his theatrical adaptation of Antoine de Saint Exupery’s novella The Little Prince, performed on The National Theatre stage starting Sunday.

Directed by Roushdy El-Shamy, the musical features renowned band Eskenderella, of which Haddad’s grandson, poet Ahmed Haddad, is a member, and is set to run for a month.

“The idea started with me and Eskenderella wanting to hold just a single night commemorating 30 years on from Haddad’s death,” El-Shamy said in interview with Ahram Online during rehearsals at The National Theatre.

El-Shamy previously organised eight evenings for Haddad and Salah Jaheen’s poetry.

“We were searching for the venue and pitched it to The National Theatre. First we were granted 15 days in Miami Theatre, then when the head of the panel watched the rehearsals, we were given a month here at The National Theatre,” he said.

El-Shamy explains how Haddad’s text maintains the core elements of The Little Prince, which poignantly tackles themes of love, loss, exploration and curiosity, but made it “wholly Egyptian, the way Haddad’s poetry is.”

Yet he adds that comparing the two would be unfair, as people familiar with the story might expect a more faithful representation.

“If someone grew up with The Little Prince and watched our play, they would feel it is wanting and incomplete, seeing as Haddad removed entire scenes and characters in his text. It is more fitting to see it as an adaptation inspired by the original novel, and they will see a glimpse of The Little Prince.”

“It is enough that he crafted it into a play, and embedded it in Egyptian culture through his language and slang poetry,” El-Shamy says.

“Haddad had a line that says ‘The heart is what sees’, and this is heart of our play. I built the play on that line, not from The Little Prince.”

Viewers can expect to feel Haddad’s mark more than Saint Exupery’s, with the narrative evoking those of Arabian folkloric fairytales.

In a sense, Men El-Qalb lel Qalb is a more focused version, by being compressed into a shorter storyline, yet retaining the original story’s thematic layers, and even more layers through the music. in tune with authentic Egyptian spirit.

“Perhaps I’m a little biased, but I believe Haddad’s ending is more beautiful than the original,” El-Shamy says.

If Men El-Qalb lel Qalb took some liberty with The Little Prince, El-Shamy took no such liberty with Haddad’s text.

“I was extremely faithful to Haddad’s text. Not a syllable has been added. It is exactly the way he crafted it,” says the director.

Since the project expanded from El-Shamy’s initial one-day plan, which he would have prepared for over six days, Min El-Qalb lel Qalb took four months of preparation.

The process, he says, was generally smooth, but not void of some challenges, one of which was a limit in production budget.

“It’s also not easy to have musicals these days. Although the play before us (Yehia El-Fakharany’s Layla Min Alf Layla) was a musical, but ours is live, and this is difficult to do,” he says.

The timing of the play also places it in close comparison to Leila Men Alf Leila, also based on poetry (of Bayram Al-Tunsi), which garnered great success at the ticket booth, grossing LE1 million in its three-month run.

“I’m told how tough a challenge it is to run a show after a big performance with a big star as Yehia El-Fakharany, but I don’t see it as a fight or a competition. Its all art and its beautiful.”

Yet if one must compare, Men El-Qalb lel Qalb is a simpler type of performance than the theatrical Leila Men Alf Leila. The scenes are like illustrative chapters to the storytelling poetry that is performed live by the characters and Eskenderella band.

“I always bet on art, whatever form it is, to speak for itself, even if it’s content is simple,” El-Shamy comments.

Being more mainstream, The National Theatre’s audience is different than the type of audience at independent venues and cultural spaces, where many poetry nights are held. The ticket booth will decide this factor’s influence on the play’s success, and whether or not it will run for longer than the agreed month.

“I started preparing the show not knowing where it will take me. But I really think Haddad’s spirit is watching over us, because of how well it worked itself out, and the fact that we have a month at The National Theatre. I feel that his soul really hasn’t left us,” says El-Shamy.

Programme:
The play opens on 14 February at 9pm
Performance days:
Saturdays, Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9pm
Sundays and Fridays, morning shows at 7pm
The National Theatre, Downtown Cairo


Fan Art Friday #120


On Fridays, fans of The Little Prince express their talent with Fan Art Friday!

Send us your creations via our facebook page, we’ll publish them here!

Adam Iksńilzramz

Adam Iksńilzramz

Akane Tanaka

Akane Tanaka

Ale Barbosa

Ale Barbosa

Aline Bouvier Bailey

Aline Bouvier Bailey
Annie Poitras

Annie Poitras

Christine Aubé Savoy

Christine Aubé Savoy

David Matthews‎

David Matthews‎

Espiri Villeda

Espiri Villeda

Julio César Morales

Julio César Morales

Lam Tsang

Lam Tsang

Lizbeth Maialen

Lizbeth Maialen

Louane

Louane

Marie-Claude Fanard Schillinger

Marie-Claude Fanard Schillinger

Melissa Zevallos Chávez

Melissa Zevallos Chávez

Myriiam Gelsomiino

Myriiam Gelsomiino

Nagihan Zengin

Nagihan Zengin

Ode Da

Ode Da

Rosanda Jušković

Rosanda Jušković

Rosany Fagundes‎

Rosany Fagundes‎

Sam Sam

Sam Sam

Shushuland

Shushuland

So LouweN

So LouweN

Theodore Sempros

Theodore Sempros

Vanesa Acosta

Vanesa Acosta

Vanina Colaiacovo

Vanina Colaiacovo

Vaninna Torres

Vaninna Torres

William Ryan

William Ryan